Tag Archives: exercise

Outdoorista – Inspiring Outdoor Women

In 2016 the Women in Adventure project surveyed hundreds of outdoor women… as a result I recently launched a new website, Outdoorista!

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The Women in Adventure project surveyed hundreds of outdoor women about their sources of inspiration, important issues, and any barriers to participation that they might have experienced during their outdoor adventures. Outdoorista is based on their feedback, it includes the content outdoor women said they would like to see…

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Outdoorista – Inspiring outdoor women Continue reading

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Fastpacking trip – running Manchester to Sheffield: 40 miles, 2 days, 1650m ascent

Fastpacking is a combination of backpacking and running. It offers an ideal blend of long distance running, freedom to camp, and the logistical challenge of carrying exactly what you need but no more.

It can open up opportunities for adventurous exploration in remote places, but it’s important to know in advance that all the gear and systems work. With my running buddy Bo, we decided on a test run from Stockport in Greater Manchester back to our homes in Sheffield. Continue reading

Thomas Theyer Fell Race – Thomas Theyer Foundation, Peak District 10.5k April 2016

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The rolling green hills and white limestone outcrops of the White Peak produced an undulating route for the first Thomas Theyer Fell Race. With sustained uphill stretches on tiny country roads, and long descents over pitted green fields and well-worn limestone trails, it made for fast feet. Continue reading

Trail running films – free and featuring women: Inspiration for the winter months

Films are a great source of inspiration and a good way to spend time when the weather’s bad and you just want to be cosy indoors. At this time of year many of us are resting, reflecting on our achievements over the past 12 months and planning new goals.

Dreams of the coming year can really motivate and help us see a positive way through the coldest darkest months. Here are five inspiring trail running films for your rest days that feature women and are free to watch online: Continue reading

Because #thisgirlcan ! A national campaign by Sport England, January 2015

This week Sport England launched a campaign “to celebrate active women who are doing their thing no matter how well they do it, or how they look” www.thisgirlcan.co.uk.  It features women participating in activities like cycling, zumba, and climbing. It’s so liberating to see these real women, and I have personally been reflecting on how important it is to have female role models to encourage and inspire me.

Although I train and climb with equal numbers of men and women, I particularly value the time I spend with female friends. We are more evenly matched in terms of strength and performance, which means that we participate on an equal footing and are more likely to share common goals to work towards.

I find it empowering to take decisions and plan together, and feel especially proud of what I have achieved through team work with my female friends, whether climbing a hard route or navigating a race in the hills. Beyond training and performance, being active together creates real quality time, shared experiences, and lays the foundations for strong and supportive friendships.

In the media and coverage of the outdoors world I generally find strong women’s voices are less common. I don’t know if that is because there are proportionally fewer women participating, whether fewer women seek to publicise and share their adventures, or whether they struggle to have their voices heard in stereotypically more masculine environments. Or maybe I just haven’t been looking in the right places.

I don’t need my role models to be exceptional in terms of performance. It’s great to celebrate women that are at the top of their game and pushing the boundaries, but regardless of your level of performance I love to see the places that you are being active, and the things that you are doing, because if you can do it, so can I.

How women are presented in the media and online is important, and This Girl Can feels so right because it has a message that all women can relate to. We need to see realistic images of healthy women. We can celebrate using our female bodies without sexualising them. We do not need make up or air brushing to make us look healthy and vibrant.

Packing light and having access to minimal facilities has challenged my assumptions about the ‘essentials’ of life, including realising that in certain circumstances make up has no practical use. Pushing my physical and mental limits has taken me to a place where there is no room to think about how I look. Being active gives me a sense of wellbeing and achievement that feels so good that it pushes out the insecurities about how I might look while I’m doing it.

It can be a vulnerable feeling to share your thoughts and experiences, but I believe that we are all role models and mentors, encouraging and inspiring each other. I would like to see active women increasing our representation, and this means building confidence in our skills and abilities, finding our voices and being comfortable sharing to a wider audience. It means recognising that our opinions and experiences have value.

My small part of it is to keep sharing the joy of being active outdoors in all seasons in the best way that I can, and to keep reading and being inspired by you…

Litton Christmas Cracker, 12.5k fell race, 14 December 2014 (organised by Tideswell Running Club)

Litton is a small and picturesque village in the Peak District, and this was the inaugural Christmas Cracker fell race. Runners registered in the tiny village hall and the start and finish line was on the perfect-looking village green, a triangle of grass overlooked by the post office, the village hall, and the traditional local pub, the Red Lion. This part of the Peak District has a gentler feel than the exposed brown moors of Kinder, it is greener with more rolling hills punctured by outcrops of white limestone. I wasn’t fooled though, this is a fell race and the route setters of the Litton Christmas Cracker weren’t thinking gentle thoughts when they chose 359m of ascent, one flooded river, and unlimited amounts of mud.

Having already run a couple of races in early December and completed a ten mile training run the day before, I wanted to treat this as a fun morning out rather than running it as a race. After the first brief uphill section, we queued for several minutes at a series of stiles and gates. If I’m honest I was grateful for the rest, but tactically I’d advise a fast start to get ahead of the crowd. Although I have never run in this area before, I have climbed, and the race went by some familiar places including Chee Dale, Raven Tor, Ravensdale, and Rubicon Wall at Water-cum-Jolly. It was nice to link all those places together by following the river Wye, it also meant that I knew what was coming as we approached Water-cum-Jolly. A fairly long stretch of what had been the path was now under water, and there was no way to avoid running through the flooded and icy cold river. It was so deep… so muddy… so fun!

The next section was mentally and physically the hardest for me, almost continuous uphill for a very long way, ending at an exposed trig point. This part of the race included an out and back section which actually made it really interesting. It was tough seeing how many people were ahead of me, shooting back down the hill and not looking like they were struggling at all. They were encouraging though, shouting to the up-hillers that we were nearly there and keep going. When I could finally see the trig point, for a long time it seemed to stay exactly the same distance away somewhere on the horizon. Finally I reached the top and as the wind buffeted me around the turning point I became one of those joyful people leaping with ease down the grassy slope. I was challenged again shortly afterwards with a steeper and more technical section, too scared of falling I picked my way down as more experienced runners bounded past. After one final uphill through some foot-sucking and very slippy mud, I was relieved to trot back down into Litton and be cheered by locals and runners onto the village green.

Overall I found this race tough, but I’m not a fell runner… yet. I now know I have to improve my endurance on long uphills, and my technique on steep downhills. The race was well organised, and the stewards were really encouraging. Tideswell Running Club are lucky to have such a beautiful and varied area to run in, thanks to them for organising this new race. I hope I get the chance to test how far I’ve come by running it again in 2015.

You can find out more about Tideswell Running Club at their website here http://tideswellrunningclub.uk/

Beating winter blues – Three ways to increase your motivation in winter

In the past I have found the winter months quite hard, often feeling low on energy and quite down. As darkness fell I just wanted to be in bed, and winter felt like a period of hibernation to be endured until lighter warmer days. This year is different. I feel energised and more motivated than ever. I know it isn’t always easy, but it is possible to actively create the right conditions to keep your motivation and energy up. Here are three ways to enjoy rather than endure this winter:

1 – Discover what you love, and do more of it. It’s important to me that I enjoy what I choose to do with my free time, and that it doesn’t feel like a pressure or a chore. At the moment it isn’t really practical to climb outdoors after work, but it is possible to run. I would like to get faster, I could go to the track and do speed sessions. But the thought of it doesn’t inspire me, and in the past I have found that the pressure of ‘having’ to stick to a training programme actually demotivates me. There have been many great moments, but one that particularly inspired me recently was pausing on a night time run at one of my favourite places at Stanage. Turning the headtorch off, looking across at the moonlit shapes of the hills on the horizon and the patterns of the lights in the Hope Valley I saw a totally new perspective on the familiar landscape that I love. When I finish work, even when it’s dark and the weather is wild, there is no part of me that doesn’t want to get out there and run through the Peaks because I know that each run will give me a unique experience. I don’t think of it as training, but as I have stopped putting pressure on myself to achieve and just enjoyed what I’m doing, I’m finding that improvements are coming naturally.

2 – Find a goal that inspires you, see yourself achieving it, and feel the real connection between that longer term vision and today’s training. I find it easy to set myself targets – for example to run a faster 10k, and it’s good to work towards them so that I can measure my progress. But targets can become a pressure, something else to beat myself up about if I don’t make progress fast enough, or if I ‘fail’ to live up to them. This winter I also have a vision – I want to go further so that I have the opportunity to see more. I want to visit remote places and learn how to be self sufficient and leave no trace. I want to acclimatise to alpine air and run up and down mountains. I want to smell warm pines and run on soft sandy trails. These goals are not quantifiable – there are no criteria to pass or fail. The only thing that will stop me is if I don’t go and do it. It has given me something to really work for, a reason to run further and faster. To be capable of achieving and enjoying them I have to train, and having such vivid goals means that I really feel like every step I train is a step that will enable me to live those dreams.

3 – Connect with people with similar attitudes and interests, stay in touch and support each other. It’s great to spend time with people who are enjoying what they’re doing. I have gained so much inspiration through meeting or reading about people that are passionate about what they do. I have fantastic training partners and friends that are always up for it, full of ideas and positivity. Through their attitudes and achievements they are proving to me what is possible. I have also found that reading magazines and following other runners, climbers, and hikers online has really made me feel part of a community and given me so many ideas for things I’d like to do. Whether we meet in person, or virtually, we are all part of a community that shares values, interests, passion, and energy. In whichever way works for you, give that support when you can, and take it when you need it.

It’s so important to make positive choices about how you spend your time and who you spend it with. Trust yourself, listen to how you feel, and make what you do work for you.  I want to say again – I know that it isn’t always easy, and sometimes even small steps can feel tough. If you feel like you struggle through winter, don’t be overwhelmed by the journey ahead, focus on those first small steps and have confidence that you are already increasing your motivation and creating the conditions to beat the winter blues.

What motivates you, especially in the winter? What do you do if you start to feel low or in a rut? If you can identify with this subject I would invite you to comment and share…